The Dead Sea Salt Deposits Might Uncover More About The Earth’s Evolution

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The Dead Sea is a salt lake bordered by Jordan and Israel. It is located at 430.5 meters (1,412 ft) below sea level, and it is 304 m (997 ft) deep. What is singular about the Dead Sea is its salinity. The Dead Sea is one of the saltiest water bodies on Earth. It has a salinity of 342g/l, around ten times saltier than any ocean on the planet. Because of the high quantity of salt of its waters, there aren’t any plants or microscopic living creatures that live in the lake.

The Dead Sea is layered in two – the top of the sea is less dense due to being warmer, while the bottom is denser because of the cold water. A peculiar element of the lake is its droplets of warm water.

The droplets of water that are not that dense, from the top of the Dead Sea, sink to the bottom of the lake, where denser water can be found, challenging the laws of physics. In theory, it should be impossible for less thick fluids to plunge into a denser liquid material.

The Dead Sea Salt Deposits Might Uncover More About The Earth’s Evolution

Engineer Raphael Ouillon, from the University of California, Santa Barbara, is the author of the study about the phenomenon. “Initially you form these tiny fingers that are too small to observe… but quickly they interact with each other as they move down, and form larger and larger structures,” declares the researcher.

A theory for the occurrence is that while the surface of the lake is agitated, whether because of waves or other factors, droplets of warm water sinks enough for it to mix with the colder water as the warm water cools off, the salt present in the water precipitates and forms salt grains that drop until they reach the bottom.

The researchers hope that by finding out more about this phenomenon could help them examine and understand how various salt deposits in Earth’s crust formed over time and may unravel the Earth’s secrets.


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