SpaceX Falcon Heavy Rocket’s Booster Got Lost Into the Sea

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SpaceX had launched last week the first commercial mission of Falcon Heavy Rocket into the orbit to release the Lockheed Martin-built Arabsat-6A communication satellite. The purpose of this mission was to provide TV, Internet, and phone services in the Middle East, Africa, and Europe. The Falcon Heavy is composed of three Falcon 9 rockets strapped together with a unique design that has the force of eighteen 747 Aircraft all firing at once.

SpaceX Falcon Heavy is the largest rocket ever built

Falcon Heavy is the biggest rocket that operates today and the second biggest rocket after the Saturn V. Saturn V was the rocket with multiple Moon missions into space between 1960 and 1970.

The Falcon Heavy’s first trip was in 2018, and it was only for testing. The test mission was to send a Tesla Roadster owned by the company on a journey to Mars and back. SpaceX had made a lot of improvements to Falcon Heavy compared to Falcon 9. With this spacecraft, SpaceX can have more ambitious projects and missions.

Why has SpaceX lost the center core booster?

After the commercial mission was completed successfully, the operational rocket return to the base and land on the SpaceX drone ship in the Atlantic Ocean on April 11. Unfortunately, over the weekend the weather had got worse, and the sea conditions had gone mad. Because of the nature turbulence, the recovery team wasn’t able to secure the center core booster of the spacecraft.

The conditions got worse and the booster began to shift until it could not remain upright. This is the first loss for SpaceX after a successful mission and a safe landing, but the safety of the team was more important. Also, the drone-ship was made for Falcon 9 booster, and the current model, the Falcon Heavy has an entirely different design. In the future, they will adapt the system for the Falcon Heavy’s next mission launch.


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