Nuclear Pasta Is The Strongest Material in The Universe, 10 Billion Times More Resistant Than Steel

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What is nuclear pasta, where it forms, and how resistant it is? These are just a few questions about the mysterious material known as nuclear pasta. Well, according to recent research conducted by three scientists from some institutions in the US and Canada, nuclear pasta is the strongest material in the Universe, and it is 10 billion times more resistant than steel.

The researchers from the Indiana University Bloomington hypothesized that nuclear pasta is forming with the help of the immense gravitational forces found beneath what remains form the exterior crust of dead stars. Similarly, scientists at the RT reported that nuclear pasta could be found at up to one kilometer below the surface of neutrino stars.

According to the scientists, nuclear plasma is a solid mix of neutrons and protons which shape up like various other forms of pasta such as blobs, tubes, and sheets.

Nuclear pasta could be 10 billion times more resistant than steel, the latest simulations in this regard revealed

If the nuclear pasta is real indeed, then it would be by 100 trillion times denser than water, while it would be 10 billion times more resistant than steel. At least, these are the outcomes of the most recent simulations conducted by a trio of researchers from various institutions from the US and Canada.

“Our results show that nuclear pasta may be the strongest known material,” wrote the researchers,  M. E. Caplan, A. S. Schneider, and C. J. Horowitz,  in their study’s report published in the journal Physical Review Letters.

Because it needs some immense gravitational forces to form it, nuclear pasta is impossible to occur anywhere on Earth naturally, not even in the laboratory. Thus, the before-mentioned scientists relied on computer simulations.

In conclusion, nuclear pasta, which is reportedly lying right beneath the surface of neutron stars, is the strongest material in the Universe and is 10 billion times more resistant than steel.

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Jasmine holds a Master’s in Journalism from Ryerson University in Toronto and writes professionally in a broad variety of genres. She has worked as a senior manager in public relations and communications for major telecommunication companies, and is the former Deputy Director for Media Relations with the Modern Coalition. Jasmine writes primarily in our LGBTTQQIAAP and Science section.


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