Mysterious Galactic “Jellyfish” Spotted By NASA In Space

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Jellyfish have been on our planet for about 500 million years and now, it seems that the NASA space agency has its very own jellyfish in space. No, it’s not some sci-fi alien creature, it’s a galaxy that’s nicknamed this way.

It seems that a “jellyfish”-like galaxy which is known as ESO 137-001, with a tail that’s made up of long gas stretching 260,000 light-years across space, is “swimming” into the view of NASA’s James Webb Telescope.

“Blue ribbons of young stars dangle from the galaxy’s disk-like cosmic tentacles,” NASA said in the statement.

The space agency continued and said that “If you look at the galaxy in X-ray light, however, you will find a giant tail of hot gas streaming behind the galaxy. After launch, NASA’s James Webb Space Telescope will study ESO 137-001 to learn how the gas is being removed from the galaxy, and why stars are forming within that gaseous tail.”

The galaxy has also been observed by Hubble and at the Chandra X-ray Observatory 

The James Webb Telescope is scheduled for launch in 2021. This jellyfish-galaxy as Fox News calls it has been first observed via the Hubble Space Telescope and the Chandra X-ray Observatory in 2014.

ESO 137-001 isn’t really close to our planet, and it’s reportedly similar in appearance to the Milky Way galaxy.

It’s about 220 million light-years away from Earth and is part of the Triangulum Australe constellation from a galaxy cluster known as Abell 3627.

Galaxy clusters are surrounded by hot gases that are forming form stars. On the other hand, the way in which stars form in the tail and the time required for that to happen is still not very precise for researchers.

“Both gas and dust are getting stripped off, but how much and what happens to the stripped material and the galaxy itself are still open questions,” said Stacey Alberts of the University of Arizona, a co-investigator on the project.


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