Magnetar At The Center of The Milky Way Revealed As A Potential Source Of Fast Radio Bursts

Share

In recent studies, the scientists focused on two pulses of radio waves emitted by a magnetar at the center of the Milky Way. The new research shed more light on magnetars, mysterious dead stars that orbit the supermassive black holes in the core of galaxies. According to scientists, these space objects could be behind the puzzling fast radio burs emissions.

Magnetars a sub-category of pulsars, and they are, as we’ve mentioned above, death stars of high densities that possess a powerful magnetic field. Usually, they are found in the proximity of the supermassive black holes in the center of galaxies. The magnetar at the center of Milky Way, our home galaxy, is now under the focus of scientists who study two pulses of radio waves the space objects emitted.

“Our observations show that a radio magnetar can emit pulses with many of the same characteristics as those seen in some FRBs. Other astronomers have also proposed that magnetars near black holes could be behind FRBs, but more research is needed to confirm these suspicions,” said Caltech graduate student Aaron Pearlman, the author of the study.

A Magnetar At The Center of The Milky Way Revealed As A Potential Source Of Fast Radio Bursts

The new research on the magnetar at the center of the Milky Way was conducted in October 2018, and the lead author presented the results of the study only yesterday, January 9th, 2019, at the meeting of the American Astronomical Society in Seattle.

The magnetar, dubbed as PSR J1745-2900 and situated next to the supermassive black hole at the center of the Milky Way, Sagittarius A, was observed by astronomers using the largest of NASA’s Deep Space Network radio dishes in Australia. The scientists found a connection between this magnetar and the fast radio burst signals.

“Finding a stable pulsar in a close, gravitationally bound orbit with the supermassive black hole at the galactic center could prove to be the Holy Grail for testing theories of gravity. If we find one, we can do all sorts of new, unprecedented tests of Albert Einstein’s general theory of relativity,” concluded Aaron Pearlman.


Share

Recommended For You

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *