Coral Gardening Dying Coral Reefs of Thailand To Be Saved By Volunteer Divers

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Fearing that the majority of the world’s coral reefs will die by 2050, a new initiative shapes up in Thailand raising hopes at least regarding the dying coral reefs in that region. The new method, recently experimented off the island of Koh Ha, aims towards coral restoration by coral gardening.

We already know that coral reefs around the world are endangered by heat waves caused by global warming, as well as by human footprint and extreme weather phenomena also triggered by climate change. Only between 2015 and 2017 the increase in the water temperatures around the world’s oceans caused the most extended coral bleaching episode witnessed so far.

Thus, it is mandatory to adopt new measures to boost the coral restoration process, around the world, to give coral reefs a chance to survive the global warming. Such a method was adopted off the island of Koh Ha, Thailand, on the coral reefs in the region, also threatened by frequent heat waves.

Volunteer divers try helping the dying coral reefs of Thailand with coral gardening

“It is not by throwing things in the water that you are going to be able to rehabilitate corals. This is called pollution,” said the Malaysian oceanographer and conservationist Anuar Abdullah. He added that coral gardening is the ideal method to restore the world’s endangered coral reefs.

“Shifting from engineering solutions, such as physically rebuilding reefs with concrete, to ecological solutions, or rebuilding with coral, is much more cost effective and typically the recovery is more successful. It is a win-win,” also said Dalton Hesley from the Benthic Ecology and Coral Reef Restoration Lab of the University of Miami, in the US.

Similar to the restoration of rainforest, coral gardening involves rejuvenating coral reefs by selecting “seedlings” that will be grown in a nursery. Now, helped by volunteer divers, the scientists experimented with the method on the dying coral reefs of Thailand, just off the island of Koh Ha, and it was a real success.

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Jasmine holds a Master’s in Journalism from Ryerson University in Toronto and writes professionally in a broad variety of genres. She has worked as a senior manager in public relations and communications for major telecommunication companies, and is the former Deputy Director for Media Relations with the Modern Coalition. Jasmine writes primarily in our LGBTTQQIAAP and Science section.


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