Ancient “Monster Galaxy” Observed By Astronomers

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Astronomers, using Chile’s Atacama Large Millimeter/submillimeter Array (ALMA), observed a so-called ancient “monster galaxy,” the COSMOS-AzTEC-1, which formed at about 2 billion years after the Big Bang and give birth to stars at a never-before-seen rate. The discovery might help scientists learn more about early galaxies in the Universe which are still puzzling them.

According to the report of this recent study, astronomers found galaxies like AzTEC-1 only 20 years ago for the first time. Ever since the scientists have been studying these space objects to try understanding the incredible stars-generating rates these galaxies have. As for the newly observed ancient “monster galaxy,” astronomers found out that it can give birth to stars thousands of time faster than Milky Way.

On the other hand, the astronomers also believe that these early galaxies, which formed immediately after the Big Bang, are the “common ancestor” of the elliptical galaxies we see today in the Universe.

An international team of scientists from the USA, Japan, Germany, and Mexico discovered the COSMOS-AzTEC-1 ancient “monster galaxy”

Using the ALMA 66 radio telescope dishes in the Chilean desert, an international team of astronomers from the USA, Japan, Germany, and Mexico observed the AztEC-1 ancient “monster galaxy.” Then, by analyzing the signature of carbon monoxide gas within the newly found galaxy, the scientists managed to create a map of this space object.

The astronomers found out huge and very thick clumps of gas that were collapsing, instead of remaining stable under the pressure of stars formation processes and supernovae. Because of these collapsing clumps of gas, stars are forming very fast but “die” in about 100 million years inside this ancient “monster galaxy.”

As they don’t have a clear explanation for how these significant amounts of gas emerged in COSMOS-AzTEC-1 galaxy, the researchers theorized that it could be the result of a galactic merger, but no evidence in this direction has been found.

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Jasmine holds a Master’s in Journalism from Ryerson University in Toronto and writes professionally in a broad variety of genres. She has worked as a senior manager in public relations and communications for major telecommunication companies, and is the former Deputy Director for Media Relations with the Modern Coalition. Jasmine writes primarily in our LGBTTQQIAAP and Science section.


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