A New Moon Mission Would Not Require A Big Budget, NASA Chief Says

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According to NASA Chief, Jim Bridenstine, the budget for a new Moon mission wouldn’t need a big budget in the style of the Apollo missions. And, however, that would be impossible since nowadays NASA get only 0.5% of the federal budget, in comparison to the 4.5 percent allocated to the US space agency back in the 60s and 70s.

But this amount would be sufficient for NASA to return humans to the Moon, Jim Bridenstine said during a meeting at NASA’s Ames Research Center. However, the crucial factor for this achievement to be successful would be the collaboration between NASA and other space agencies or companies.

“We now have more space agencies on the surface of the planet than we’ve ever had before. And even countries that don’t have a space agency – they have space activities, and they want to partner with us on our return to the moon,” Bridenstine said.

With commercial and industrial collaborations, NASA would be successful in mounting a new Moon mission

As Jim Bridenstine stated, NASA’s current partnerships with international commercial and industrial companies, as well as with other space agencies, would prove useful for a new Moon mission.

“So, between our international and commercial partners and our increased budget, I think we’re going to be in good shape to accomplish the objectives of Space Policy Directive 1,” claimed Bridenstine.

Also, the Lunar Orbital Platform-Gateway is the NASA’s centerpiece for the future crewed mission to the Moon and beyond. This moon-orbiting station would be developed and reached with the help of the NASA’s Space Launch System mega-rocket and Orion capsule. The so-called Lunar Orbital Platform-Gateway would serve as a hub for the upcoming lunar exploration missions.

The first piece of the moon-orbiting station, its power and propulsion module, will launch in 2022, while NASA hopes the Lunar Orbital Platform-Gateway would be concluded by 2024.

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Jasmine holds a Master’s in Journalism from Ryerson University in Toronto and writes professionally in a broad variety of genres. She has worked as a senior manager in public relations and communications for major telecommunication companies, and is the former Deputy Director for Media Relations with the Modern Coalition. Jasmine writes primarily in our LGBTTQQIAAP and Science section.


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