A Mystery Comet Could Be Space Debris From Another Civilization, Claim Harvard Scientists

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There is a mysterious comet dubbed as Oumuamua that has been classified as a comet, but one certain astronomer does not believe that it behaves like one.

The comet is a long flat space rock that has baffled scientists for quite a while now since it zipped past Earth last year.

It seems that this so-called comet could, in fact, be a piece of alien technology or at least this is what a new paper released by the Harvard scientists claims.

The paper has been written by Abraham Loeb, chair of astronomy, and Shmuel Bialy, a postdoctoral fellow, from the Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics and it was submitted to the Astrophysical Journal Letters.

The paper claims that “Oumuamua — the cigar-shaped object that briefly visited us from a distant star system — “may be a fully operational probe sent intentionally to Earth vicinity by an alien civilization.”

“I follow the maxim of Sherlock Holmes. When you have excluded the impossible, whatever remains, however improbable, must be the truth,” Abraham Loeb says.

This is our first Interstellar visitor

Oumuamua was discovered more than a year ago in October 2017 by the Candian astronomer Robert Weryk at the University of Hawaii’s Institute for Astronomy.

This seems to be our very first known Insterstellar visitor and the science community has been struggling to figure it out.

“It’s very weird. It’s nothing that we have seen before,” Loeb said. “It seems to have an extreme shape based on the reflectance of sunlight. It has very strange dimensions. It is at least five to 10 times longer than it is wide.”

Oumuamua has been deviated from its trajectory, and a comet can only do that when it releases gases that produce a rocket effect. But this one does not have the tail that’s associated with outgassing.

Loeb said that there is something that is pushing it besides gravity. It could be radiation from the sun, he believes.

He concluded that this could very well be remaining space debris from another civilization.

Rada attended the courses in the Faculty of Letters, Romanian-English section, and finished the Faculty of Theatre and Television, Theatrical Journalism section, both within the framework of Babeş-Bolyai University of Cluj-Napoca. Up till now, she reviewed books, movies, and theatre-plays, enjoying subjects from the cultural niche. Her experience in writing also intersects the IT niche, given the fact that she worked as a content editor for firms that produce software for mobile devices. She is collaborating with online advertising agencies, writing articles for several websites and blogs.


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