These Canadian Cities Have the Highest Number of Crimes Reported to Police

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New data from Statistics Canada shows which cities have the highest numbers of crimes reported to police and how serious they were in 2017. According to the data released on 23 July, Saskatoon is the on top, with a score over 106. Other Canadian metropolitan areas did not score above 100. The lowest score of crimes reported was in Toronto (48.7), Quebec City (48.5) and Barrie, Ont. (45.3).

The data took into consideration 34 metropolitan areas from Canada.

The report also looked at how index scores grew or decreased in 2017, compared with the previous year. The index scores grew considerably over the last year in Greater Sudbury, Ont., Moncton, N.B. and Guelph, Ont. On the other hand, St. John’s, Regina and Vancouver, experienced a huge decrease.

As a total, the severity index for 2017 all over Canada was at 72.9, having over 1.9 million crimes reported to police, which makes it the third increase in the national index after 11 years of decreases.

Severe Crimes Involving Guns

Over 7,700 Canadians have reported having been victims of severe crimes that involved one or more guns. The biggest increase in gun-related crime was seen in Saskatchewan – 47% higher compared with the incidents in 2016.

Although Regina has seen a decrease in violent crime, the gun-related incidents almost tripled in the period between 2013-2017. According to the Regina Police Chief Evan Bray, it seems that the growing drug trade in the city is connected with the increase in gun activity:

“Almost every time we find firearms, we’re finding drugs.”

The report released by Statistics Canada shows that (especially in Quebec), the biggest increase in crime comes from reporting sexual assaults and possession of stolen property. Both of these and the rise in homicide and vehicle thefts are part of almost half of the entire increase in crime in Canada.

There is some good news about offenses like impaired driving or crimes related to marijuana. They both decreased in 2017, making it the sixth straight decline, with impaired driving getting 4% lower and marijuana-related crimes falling by 15%.

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Andre Blair s is the lead editor for Advocator.ca. He holds a B.A. in Psychology from the University of Toronto, and a Master of Science in Public Health (M.S.P.H.) from the School of Public Health, Department of Health Administration, at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill. Andre specializes in environmental health, but writes on a variety of issues.


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