The Longest Eclipse of the Century Witnessed in July 2018

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July hosts a total lunar eclipse and a Blood Moon. The celestial body veils on the night of 27 July flowing from East to West and adorning the night with its bleeding ethereal glow.  The mesmerizing red orb of the night will conquer the sky at the end of this month.

Who catches the whole event

The process can be entirely seen in Central Asia and Eastern Africa, but unfortunately, other parts of the world will not get a glimpse of the whole dazzling show because it may happen below the horizon. The first part of it will not be visible at all from the UK.

UK can still see the Blood Moon

At 8.50 pm BST the Blood Moon will appear in London. And around 9.21 pm BST it will reach the maximum eclipse. The phenomenon will finish by 10.13pm BST. Ms Wibisono states “The eclipse will start off in the east and then when the eclipse ends, when it’s completely out of the Earth’s shadow, it will be fairly high in the south about 12 to 12.30am.”

Eclipse schedule

The initial phase opens the eclipse around 6.47pm (5.14 pm UTC). The grey-white disc will gradually vanish and the second part of the eclipse will appear at 7.24pm BST (6.24pm UTC) flowing to Western Hemisphere.

The Blood Moon will appear by 8.30pm UTC (7.30pm UTC) after the moon is completely darkened by Earth shadow. At 9.21 pm BST (8.21 UTC) the full moon will reach the middle point of Earth’s shadow. Amid this time it will shine with an allure of dark red and burned orange.

The eclipse course will end step by step by 10.13 pm BST (9.13pm UTC), but the next partial veiling will begin an hour later at 11.19 pm BST ( 10.19pm UTC).

The last episode of the eclipse will occur around 12.38 BST (11.38UTC) when the moon shines over Southwest Africa.

The total amount of time will be one hour and 43 minutes, making it the most extended eclipse of the century.

When the moon is full again it will shine down with its particular silver shading and gleam.

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Brad is a former Senior Fellow at the Schuster Institute for Investigative Journalism at Brandeis University, is an award-winning travel, culture, and parenting writer. His writing has appeared in many of the Canada’s most respected and credible publications, including the Toronto Star, CBC News and on the cover of Smithsonian Magazine. A meticulous researcher who’s not afraid to be controversial, he is nationally known as a journalist who opens people’s eyes to the realities behind accepted practices in the care of children. Brad is a contributing journalist to Advocator.ca


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