Teen Girls to Get HPV Vaccine Are Not More Likely to Engaged in Risky Sex, Shows UBC Study

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Even though girls get vaccinated against the Human papilloma virus (HPV), they do not prefer to engage in a risky sexual activity, shows UBC study.

The study was published on 15 October in the Canadian Medical Association Journal and looked into the data from 2003 and 2013 that was analyzing the sexual behavior of teen girls.

Girls from Grade 6 and 9 in 2008 received the HPV vaccine, and so did the girls in Grade 6 after 2011.

The team of researchers looked at all the data in 2003, 2008 and 2013 from the BC Adolescent Health Survey which was conducted every five years among students from Grade 7 to 12.

Teenagers Are Not More Promiscuous After Getting the HPV Vaccine

According to the results, only 18.3% of the teenage girls had sex in 2013, compared to 20.6% in 2008 and 21.3 in 2003. Not only the number has dropped, but there was also a drop in girls under 14 years-old that had sex and an increase in condom use.

Elizabeth Saewyc, UBC nursing professor and senior study author, stated that:

“What we have seen over the past 10 years is that young people are making healthier choices around sexual behaviours. The knowledge and information about sexual health and the availability of the HPV vaccine to help prevent cancer has not changed things for the worse.”

This study was conducted after parents showed fears that the vaccine against HPV would make the teenagers more promiscuous. However, the lead author of the study and the assistant director at the Women’s Health Research Institute at BC Women’s Hospital + Health Centre – Dr. Gina Ogilvie, found that the results of the study found the opposite, adding that:

“These findings are consistent with studies in Scandinavia, and smaller clinic-based studies in the U.S. confirming that adolescent women do not make poorer sexual health choices after the HPV vaccine.”

B.C. has only 67% – the lowest HPV vaccination rate in Canada.

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Andre Blair s is the lead editor for Advocator.ca. He holds a B.A. in Psychology from the University of Toronto, and a Master of Science in Public Health (M.S.P.H.) from the School of Public Health, Department of Health Administration, at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill. Andre specializes in environmental health, but writes on a variety of issues.


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