Tafenoquine Approved by FDA as a New Malaria Drug

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The newest drug for treating malaria has been approved by authorities from the US, which was made especially for recurring malaria. 8.5 million of people got sick each year, an infection caused by the Plasmodium vivax parasite.

Is a challenge to get rid of this type of malaria, because it may remain latent in the liver for a period, before its revival several times.

The specialists are checking the drug to see if is good for their population.

Recurrent disease

Kids are in danger, getting many attacks from one wound. From an infected person, that doesn’t know he is infected, the disease can be spread all around the world.

The Food and Drug Administration (FDA), approved the medicine, tafenoquine, which can remove the parasite from the liver and people will never get it again.

On the market is another drug called “primaquine”, but you have to take it for 14 days when you only need a dose of tafenoquine. Also, if people stars to feel better they stop taking the medicine.

Prudence required

Even if the drug is effective, there might be some side effects you have to know.

If you have enzyme problems, you should not take it because you can get anemia, and also, at higher doses, can cause problems for people with psychiatric disorders.

According to Ric Price, from Oxford University: “The ability to get rid of the parasite in the liver with a single dose of tafenoquine is a phenomenal achievement and in my mind it represents one of the most significant advances in malaria treatment in the last 60 years.”

GSK reconverted the drug, so can be used to get rid of pests from the liver.

The authorities from the countries where this type of malaria exists will test it and after that will give it to the sick.

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Jasmine holds a Master’s in Journalism from Ryerson University in Toronto and writes professionally in a broad variety of genres. She has worked as a senior manager in public relations and communications for major telecommunication companies, and is the former Deputy Director for Media Relations with the Modern Coalition. Jasmine writes primarily in our LGBTTQQIAAP and Science section.


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