Study Suggests Feeding Meat to your Infants Could Help Them Grow Faster

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The talk around being sure of what you should or you should not feed your infant has been a discussion that has been going on for as long as one can remember since there are always theories that one food group is better for the development process of an infant than another. However, what people have always wondered was if it would be okay to feed your child meat during their developmental stages.

A new study has been published which suggests that giving meat-based products for your children is good for their growth. If you want to find out more then read on!

What did the study find

The research paper that was just published in the American Journal of Clinical Nutrition has said those infants who grow up being fed formula could also be fed meat since it is an important protein source.

One meat example is pork, since it contains the micronutrients that would help the infant grow. When an infant is between 4 and 6 months old he or she is already ready to move onto solid foods so introducing meat as a complimentary food group during that process could help them grow up faster.

In order to test out this theory, a group of babies between 5 and 12 months old were given pureed beef and ham. Before they started eating meat products the children would be getting around 2 grams of protein per kilogram on a daily basis and during the study they would be getting 3 grams of protein. Researchers found that infants who ate meat grew 1 inch more than infants who did not and they did not suffer the risk of becoming overweight.

This certainly suggests that feeding your baby meat in small doses could help him or her grow up to be strong and healthy.

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Brad is a former Senior Fellow at the Schuster Institute for Investigative Journalism at Brandeis University, is an award-winning travel, culture, and parenting writer. His writing has appeared in many of the Canada’s most respected and credible publications, including the Toronto Star, CBC News and on the cover of Smithsonian Magazine. A meticulous researcher who’s not afraid to be controversial, he is nationally known as a journalist who opens people’s eyes to the realities behind accepted practices in the care of children. Brad is a contributing journalist to Advocator.ca


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