Sprinkled Sand – A Way to Save Arctic Ice?

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This would seem like a very ambitious attempt to save Earth’s already rapidly melting ice cap and to be quite honest with you, it is exactly what you think it is. This project is going to be carried out on the North meadow lake, where reflective sand is going to be sprinkled on top of the ice to see if it would slow down the melting process, and if it does to what degree will it slow down the melting. The project has been called Ice911.

The science behind the experiment

The founder of this project has stated that the ice that has melted will not come back on its own so it is our duty to preserve the one that we still have left. If it all goes according to plan, the team wants to cover the ice equivalent of Costa Rica with reflective sand particles. It remains to be seen if the founder’s idea, Leslie Field, is doable or not.

The fact are that the Arctic ice that we have is melting down at a rate that has not been seen or recorded in the fast 1500 years and that NASA has calculated that about 13 percent of it is going to melt down every decade.

In order to stop the ice from melting, Field decided to sprinkle small balls of silica that are even thinner than the breath of one strand of human hair, balls that are able to reflect up to 90 percent of the light that they get from the Sun. The price of this endeavor is quite high, coming up to 750 million dollars just to cover the 19,000 square miles that she wants to but, when compared to other projects and proposals, this is by far the most cost effective option out there.

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Brad is a former Senior Fellow at the Schuster Institute for Investigative Journalism at Brandeis University, is an award-winning travel, culture, and parenting writer. His writing has appeared in many of the Canada’s most respected and credible publications, including the Toronto Star, CBC News and on the cover of Smithsonian Magazine. A meticulous researcher who’s not afraid to be controversial, he is nationally known as a journalist who opens people’s eyes to the realities behind accepted practices in the care of children. Brad is a contributing journalist to Advocator.ca


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