South African Scientist has Come Up with a Malaria Scanner

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It looks like geneticist Vinet Coetzee has come up with a scanner that would be able to diagnose malaria. She said that this invention could best be used in the rural areas of Africa, her argument being centered on the fact that this model is affordable, it is non-invasive and it can detect malaria rapidly.

More about the prototype

This bold prototype has been featured in the Next Einstein Forum conference that took place last week in Rwanda. This is by far the largest conference in the continent on this topic. The main goal of this conference is to showcase the advancements in science that have been done by African scientists.

Since Africa has been left behind by other continents when it comes to technology, it is trying to make up for lost ground at a fast pace and it will not allow itself to shun or dismiss the academic and scientific finds of female researchers and female scientists. Africa does not want to have a science field where the number of men dominates the number of women.

The UNESCO Science Report has shown that some countries in Africa have already taken the steps needed to increase the funding for their research and development departments in order to create a more stable economy. These countries are Ethiopia, Mali and Kenya.

There is also a program going on created by the African Institute for Mathematical Sciences that gives out scholarships to students that want to pursue their MA’s from center in Cameroon, Senegal, Ghana, Rwanda, Tanzania and South Africa.

Powerful representation

It looks like representation matters as well. With Black Panther coming out recently, it looks like African women are finally represented in the media. With the powerful image of a black women scientist, it looks like females are more than encouraged to pursue a career in science.

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Brad is a former Senior Fellow at the Schuster Institute for Investigative Journalism at Brandeis University, is an award-winning travel, culture, and parenting writer. His writing has appeared in many of the Canada’s most respected and credible publications, including the Toronto Star, CBC News and on the cover of Smithsonian Magazine. A meticulous researcher who’s not afraid to be controversial, he is nationally known as a journalist who opens people’s eyes to the realities behind accepted practices in the care of children. Brad is a contributing journalist to Advocator.ca


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