Saskatchewan’s Premier Scott Moe Disappointed By The Discussion With Justin Trudeau On The Carbon Tax

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Saskatchewan’s Premier Scott Moe admitted he is not happy with the outcomes of the meeting with Prime Minister Justin Trudeau and the members of the federal Liberal caucus in Saskatoon where they gathered to discuss the issue of the carbon tax.

“It’s no secret we’ve had a frosty relationship. I would say the ball is in the prime minister and the federal government’s court,” admitted Scott Moe.

Environment Minister Catherine McKenna opposing carbon sequestration

Premier Scott Moe presented his Saskatchewan Party government’s plan to boost carbon sequestration and enhance the measures to cut pollution as it is the right thing for Saskatchewan. That’s contrasting the federal government’s proposal for a carbon tax.

Earlier today, the federal Environment Minister Catherine McKenna clearly presented the federal government’s disagreement regarding Saskatchewan’s Premier Scott Moe proposal for carbon sequestration to cut pollution.

“It’s unfortunate that there are conservative politicians that have no plan to tackle climate change and have no plan to grow a clean economy. You can do both. You can tackle climate change, and you can grow a clean economy. And you can create good jobs. Or, I guess if you’re a conservative politician, you can do neither,” stated McKenna.

The carbon tax is ineffective, Scott Moe thinks

According to Scott Moe, Saskatchewan’s Premier, the carbon tax proposed by the federal government would “pull a billion dollars” right out of the province’s pocket harming the Saskatchewan’s mining- and oil-reliant economy.

“To be honest, there’s a fork in the road,” stated Scott Moe before adding that the carbon tax is ineffective and is only moving pollutions to other regions of the world.

“We cannot move forward with a bad deal. I’m not certain we can move forward with no deal either,” added Saskatchewan’s Premier Scott Moe.

On the other hand, “if provinces don’t take serious climate action, if they don’t recognize the cost of pollution, we will have to step in, and we will return the revenues to individuals directly,” concluded McKenna defending the federal government’s carbon tax proposal.

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Jasmine holds a Master’s in Journalism from Ryerson University in Toronto and writes professionally in a broad variety of genres. She has worked as a senior manager in public relations and communications for major telecommunication companies, and is the former Deputy Director for Media Relations with the Modern Coalition. Jasmine writes primarily in our LGBTTQQIAAP and Science section.


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