Plastic Surgery For Men Has Seen a Spike in 2017. What Did They Change?

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We usually think of women when we say cosmetic surgery, but a new report shows us that a lot of men show up to talk with plastic surgeons and improve their appearance.

The American Society of Plastic Surgeons has reported that in 2017 there were 1.3 million procedures on male patients. It only increased by 1% since 2016, but it’s 4% higher than in 2015.

Dr. Lorelei Grunwaldt stated in a press release:

“More and more men are coming to my office to have an open discussion about their insecurities. When I explain the wide range of surgeries and procedures available to help them achieve their goals, I can see the look of relief on their faces.”

Procedures Differ in Young and Older Men

Young men are more likely to get liposuction (23% of the cases), tummy tucks (12%) and reduction of breasts (30%). Older men just want to look as young as they feel, so they’re happy to erase a few years off of their faces.

Almost 100,000 men in the U.S. had filler injections – 99% more cases than in 2016! Botox has seen a rise in popularity too – four times more cases than in the previous year.

Dr. Jeffrey Janis, president of the American Society of Plastic Surgeons, explained how these interventions are known as:

“Some people call this the ‘executive edge’ because a lot of patients report that they want to look younger to continue to compete in the workplace. But I think, more often, men just want to look as young as they feel.”

Dr. Peter Lennox, the president of the Canadian Society of Aesthetic Plastic Surgery and Dr. Mitchell Brown, plastic surgeon, and professor of surgery at the University of Toronto stated that these statistics are not surprising.

“As cosmetic surgery in general has become more mainstream, men have also become exposed to the options and are more accepting. Some have postulated that the rise in social media has also increased acceptance and interest in cosmetic surgery in general, with people much more commonly in online photos, etc.”

Mitchell explains that they see in their office men of all ages, but the age difference is seen only in the procedures they want to have done.

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Andre Blair s is the lead editor for Advocator.ca. He holds a B.A. in Psychology from the University of Toronto, and a Master of Science in Public Health (M.S.P.H.) from the School of Public Health, Department of Health Administration, at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill. Andre specializes in environmental health, but writes on a variety of issues.


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