NOW Life-And-Death Struggles to Save the Thai’s Cave-Captive Young Football Team

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Thailand`s police officers are struggling badly to carry through the 12 children and their 25-year-old football coach caught in a flooded cavern. The enters in the cave provide little alternatives but to put the non-swimmers in great danger.

All started during an outing in the caves on June 23 when the whole football team was declared lost. At that time the cave Tam Luan Nang None has been washed down by a flash flood.

Luckily, all the boys and their 25-year-old coordinator were found in good health conditions.

In present, the Scuba instructors are teaching them some basic diving lessons. But they might not hold up swimming for 3 hours, which is a difficult task for a pro. Also, the conditions through the cave system are not being favorable.

Interview with Glenda Chong from the Channel New Asia

Glenda Chong from the Channel New Asia resumes the threats for the rescuees in deciding to be lifted up by swimming and diving.

“What’s being considered now is getting the group to dive out but this poses major risks.

“First thing is the water flow is very strong in some parts. It’s also muggy, meaning visibility is practically zero.

“A confined space, that’s also an issue because in some areas it is so narrow that divers had to take their tanks off to squeeze through.

“Most of these young boys don’t know how to swim, let alone dive.

“Rescue teams are now giving them crash courses.

“A starting rope which is already in place should help.

“It can guide each boy and his rescue diver out.

“Alternatively, rescue divers can position themselves along the route passing the boys.

“And they’re also likely to position oxygen tanks at regular intervals to ensure enough air supply.

“Still, the entire ordeal is expected to take three hours or more for each boy.”

After more than a week, the officials are not losing hope in finding the best way to take them out at day-light.

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Brad is a former Senior Fellow at the Schuster Institute for Investigative Journalism at Brandeis University, is an award-winning travel, culture, and parenting writer. His writing has appeared in many of the Canada’s most respected and credible publications, including the Toronto Star, CBC News and on the cover of Smithsonian Magazine. A meticulous researcher who’s not afraid to be controversial, he is nationally known as a journalist who opens people’s eyes to the realities behind accepted practices in the care of children. Brad is a contributing journalist to Advocator.ca


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