Mosquito Season Brings West Nile Virus in the US

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It’s not only summer season, but it’s also mosquito season in the US. They’re annoying, and they’re very dangerous. In Ohio, Washington, and Virginia, they tested positive for the West Nile virus.

Areas near Alexandria, Johnstown and Harrison Township in Ohio, Benton County in Washington and Suffolk, Virginia contain mosquitoes that tested positive for the virus.

Health officials warn residents – especially those that live in states with warm and dry climates – to know that this summer many mosquitoes carry the disease.

On June 21-22, the Ohio Department of Health trapped and tested mosquitoes, and found out that they carry the virus for many days.

The Benton County Mosquito Control discovered last week that they had mosquitoes with the virus. Benton-Franklin County Health District’s Dr. Amy Person stated that the health officials would not rest easy until the frost arrives.

The district manager of Benton County Mosquito Control, Angela Beehler, explains that it happens every year:

“We deal with West Nile virus every year, so it’s kind of a routine with us from the beginning of the season. We start looking in February and then most of our crew comes on in April.”

In Virginia, areas of Riverview, North Street, and Dumville Lane have mosquitoes with West Nile Virus. Moreover, bugs carrying Eastern Equine Encephalitis were found in Cove Point and Lamb Avenue.

The West Nile Virus Symptoms and How to Avoid Mosquitoes

The West Nile Virus is transmitted by mosquitoes, with most cases occurring in the summer and fall, says CDC. All continental United States have had cases of the virus, and many people infected with the virus don’t show symptoms of infection.

There are 20% of cases which develop symptoms like fever, headaches, body aches, and joint pains; can have rashes, diarrhea, or vomit. One in 150 cases, people can develop a serious illness which affects the central nervous system – and it can be fatal.

A way to avoid getting mosquito bites is to wear clothing that covers the body and use mosquito repellents. Avoid getting outside in the peak hours – one hour before dusk and one hour before dawn. Eliminate all stagnant water around the house to destroy any chance of mosquitoes to breed.

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Andre Blair s is the lead editor for Advocator.ca. He holds a B.A. in Psychology from the University of Toronto, and a Master of Science in Public Health (M.S.P.H.) from the School of Public Health, Department of Health Administration, at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill. Andre specializes in environmental health, but writes on a variety of issues.


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