Medical Groups Sue FDA for Delaying E-cigarette and Cigar Regulation

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The Food and Drug Administration has just been sued for delaying some rules for e-cigarettes and cigars. The delay will result in exposing consumers for years to tobacco products that contain “lethal and addictive components”.

Last summer, the deadline was extended, and it was part of a plan to regulate tobacco. The lawsuit challenges this decision of prolonging the deadlines: manufacturers now can submit files for combustible products (cigars) until 2021 and noncombustible products (e-cigarettes) until 2022. Originally, the deadline was this August, for any item that appeared on the market after February 2007.

These extensions are good news for the tobacco industry (that make e-cigarettes), as many products might have been banned this summer.

Health groups have filed a suit, arguing that the flavored tobacco products that have been allowed on the market have targeted teenagers and even children in order to stay on the market.

Important Organizations Fight Against FDA Delay Extensions

The American Academy of Pediatrics, American Cancer Society Cancer Action Network, American Heart Association, American Lung Association, Campaign for Tobacco-Free Kids, Truth Initiative and some individual pediatricians have joined hands to fight against the delays.

The Food and Drug Administration did not want to comment on this issue.

Until now, the FDA Commissioner Scott Gottlieb has pledged to reduce the nicotine levels in cigarettes to reach a minimum of addictive, toward non-addictive levels. The groups that have sued FDA on Tuesday support Gottlieb’s plans. Another issue that FDA tries to solve is how to regulate premium cigars.

The health groups that have just sued FDA brought as evidence the best-selling e-cigarette brand – JUUL, which is very popular among teenagers, due to its mango, crème Brulee and fruit medley flavors. The FDA violates the Administrative Procedures Act in delaying the reviews without giving the public the chance to comment on the decision.

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Andre Blair s is the lead editor for Advocator.ca. He holds a B.A. in Psychology from the University of Toronto, and a Master of Science in Public Health (M.S.P.H.) from the School of Public Health, Department of Health Administration, at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill. Andre specializes in environmental health, but writes on a variety of issues.


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