Long Winters Make Spring Allergies Worse Because of the Pollen Vortex

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Springtime is here, and after such a long winter, all the colorful and beautiful flowers are blooming. They also start releasing pollen in the air and that’s not great news for all of those that are allergic to it. Every year, there is a “pollen vortex” or “pollen tsunami.”

But with the cold weather until April, flowers are blooming late, and many of the flowers that had to normally bloom in April, now bloom at the same time as the ones in early spring. This leads to all flowers blooming and causing a “perfect storm for allergies”, said experts.

Pollen Season Has Increased in With 25 Days

According to the Environmental Protection Agency, between 1998-2015, many cities have seen a lengthy ragweed season. In some regions, the pollen season has increased with 25 days.

Starting with last week, a warmer weather finally hit the regions and that also meant pollen in the air with all the plants blooming at once. This means that people with allergies to pollen will have more severe symptoms like itchy nose, eyes, congestion and sneezing.

If you thought that rain will settle the issue, information provided by pollen.com says otherwise. It seems that not even rainy or cooler ways will lower the impact of pollen waves.

How to Keep Away From Pollen

With this beautiful weather, many people would normally want to spend time in the outdoors to enjoy the sun and warmth, but for a nice weekend, the ones that have pollen allergies should consider a few tips.

Drain the pollen out of your nose with a neti pot. It will also help loosen up mucus. Before going to bed, take a shower to get rid of the pollen particles from your hair and body. Warm nights are wonderful, but it’s best to keep the windows closed until the peak of the allergy season goes away. If it’s too hot, use air conditioning, which has filters to keep pollen away.

The pollen season might be intense, but the good news is that it will be a short season!

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Andre Blair s is the lead editor for Advocator.ca. He holds a B.A. in Psychology from the University of Toronto, and a Master of Science in Public Health (M.S.P.H.) from the School of Public Health, Department of Health Administration, at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill. Andre specializes in environmental health, but writes on a variety of issues.


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