Global Warming Increase the Strength of the Waves

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It seems that global warming is even more dangerous than it was first thought. While many researchers worry about the rise of the sea level a team of scientist made a new discovery that sheds a grim warning for the future.

In a study that was published recently the team notes that waves from all the oceans are becoming stronger. The surface waves of the ocean are directed by local wind patterns. Those patterns are directly influenced by climate changes. Since global warming makes the air hotter, certain patterns are adjusted accordingly. The new patterns have led to stronger winds which obviously generate stronger waves.

The authors also note that the global wave power has increased.

This may not seem like an important change for most people but it will have a long lasting impact on naval industries that include ship transportation of goods and fishing. Jobs in these industries are already dangerous and the risks will continue to grow in the future. Official statistics state that commercial fishing has a mortality rate that is up to 32 times higher in comparison to the mortality rate of the general working population that lives in the US. 18% of the deaths have been caused by powerful waves that struck the workers.

According to the study the power of the waves has increased by 0.41% for each year that passed from 1949 to 2008, using kilowatts per meter as a measuring unit. Keep in mind that this is an average and the increase has been significantly bigger in some zones.

One of the most affected zones is Antarctica. Traveling there is a risky endeavor from the start due to the sea ice. The power increase of the Southern Ocean, which surrounds the zone, reached approximately 2% per year.

Since oceans warm more slowly than other environments they will store the heat for a longer period of time. The consequences of climate change are drier than we ever expected.


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