Divers Discover Giant Squid Carcass: The ‘Krakens’ Live in New Zealand’s Waters

Share

A monstrous giant squid was found washed up on the beach in Wellington (New Zealand). It was a regular day when three brothers were heading for their morning dive and discovered the giant squid on the shore.

Daniel, Jack, and Matthew Aplin were on their way towards the beach when near Red Rocks, on the South Coast of the city, when they saw the beached creature:

“My brother said ‘what’s that over there?’ and pointed it out. It was right next to the track so we pulled over and we were like: ‘It’s a big squid’” said Daniel Aplin in an interview.

A One Of a Kind Experience

The brothers explained that during their dives, they saw sharks but never have they seen such a big squid. Measurements show that the creature was 4.2-meter-long.

Stunned by their discovery, the brothers called the National Institute of Water and Atmospheric Research who said that they would come to collect the squid at once.

Even though for the divers it was a one of a kind experience, a spokesperson from the Department of Conservation stated that the creature was a giant squid and that their bodies regularly wash up on the beach.

One of the brothers explained that this beached squid was “pretty clean, nothing major on it. There was a scratch on the top of its head but smaller than a lighter, tiny, wouldn’t think that’s what killed it.”

Squids can reach up to 13 meters long, which is almost eight times the height of an average human being. The giant squid is the largest type of squid, but there’s one bigger: the colossal squid! Male giant squids have their arms filled with suckers and barbs.

Young squids usually become prey for the deep-sea sharks, and the bigger ones are hunted by sperm whales. As for what squids eat, they prefer other squid species or deep-sea fish, catching them with two tentacles and gripping them with their serrated rings. They take the prey towards a powerful beak and shred it to pieces, ingesting it.

The photos above became popular on social media, and a commenter stated that the New Zealand’s national museum Te Papa in Wellington has a colossal, squid which is more than 5.2 meters long.

mm

Andre Blair s is the lead editor for Advocator.ca. He holds a B.A. in Psychology from the University of Toronto, and a Master of Science in Public Health (M.S.P.H.) from the School of Public Health, Department of Health Administration, at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill. Andre specializes in environmental health, but writes on a variety of issues.


Share

Recommended For You

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *