Current Technology makes Terraforming Mars Impossible

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Terraforming has been a much-discussed subject in the scientific community since the theory first appeared, being featured not only in formal discussion but also in science-fiction novels. One of the possible ways to make Mars similar to Earth is to release the carbon dioxide deposits in order to create an atmosphere and warm the planet.

According to a recently published study Mars is not able to retain enough carbon dioxide in order to from the atmosphere. It is essential to be able to adapt the planet to our needs before we try to establish the first colonies.

While the Martian atmosphere does contain carbon dioxide, it cannot support the formation of liquid water because it is to thin and cold. Another issue is the fact that the atmospheric pressure is so low that any liquid on the surface would instantly freeze or evaporate.

Those who desire the terraforming of Mars suggest that a mixture of carbon dioxide and water vapor would from the greenhouse gases needed in order to heat the Red Planet.  Researchers have analyzed samples of polar ice scanned by the Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter and Mars Odyssey in order to determine the ratio of carbon dioxide.

The environmental weight on Mars is around 0.6 percent of Earth’s. Since Mars is not as close to the Sun as Earth, scientists appraise a CO2 weight like Earth’s aggregate environmental weight is expected to raise temperatures enough to take into consideration stable fluid water. The most available source is CO2 in the polar ice tops; which could be vaporized by using a melting accelerant dust or even high-powered explosives. Vaporizing the ice tops would contribute enough CO2 to twofold the Martian weight to 1.2 percent of Earth’s, as indicated by the new examination.

The study concludes that terraforming is not an option unless we develop radical technologies. Steps are taken in order to develop new methods, but it will take a long time until they will be usable.

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Brad is a former Senior Fellow at the Schuster Institute for Investigative Journalism at Brandeis University, is an award-winning travel, culture, and parenting writer. His writing has appeared in many of the Canada’s most respected and credible publications, including the Toronto Star, CBC News and on the cover of Smithsonian Magazine. A meticulous researcher who’s not afraid to be controversial, he is nationally known as a journalist who opens people’s eyes to the realities behind accepted practices in the care of children. Brad is a contributing journalist to Advocator.ca


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