Chronic Hepatitis C Comes with No Warning

Share

People born between 1945 and 1975 are the group of people who are most likely to suffer from chronic hepatitis C in Canada, and Greg Powell is a Canadian who is part of those people. Greg contacted the hepatitis C in the 1980s, but the diagnosis came ten years later. Greg was already suffering from hemophilia B which is a hereditary bleeding disorder, so he needed to benefit from a series of blood transfusions. n he realized that the hepatitis C came through one of these transfusions.

From hemophilia b and a slow-moving hepatitis C, Greg Powell found himself in the position of suffering from liver failure and onto a transplant list. Despite all these unfortunate moments, Greg was lucky enough to get accepted into a clinical trial which gave him the medication that cured and treated his disease.

Greg says:

“Prior to my diagnosis, I didn’t have any symptoms. But I eventually got really sick and was told a liver transplant might not change the outcome. I didn’t know how much time I had left. I’m thankful I had a wonderful support system, and that I was treated and cured.”

You do not receive a warning before Hepatitis C comes in your life because you start showing its symptoms after the liver is severely damaged. The liver is attacked by a virus which causes the disease, and it even makes people develop other complications such as liver cancer, cirrhosis and even death from liver failure.

If you are a Canadian born between 1945 and 1975 you should seriously take this information into consideration and get tested for hepatitis C until it is too late. The Canadian Association for the Study of the Liver had recently made a publication which guides you on how to manage hepatitis C, recommending Canadians also be tested based on age, not just risk factors.

“My advice is to get tested, and if you are diagnosed with hepatitis C, get treated so you can be cured,” said Greg.

mm

Jasmine holds a Master’s in Journalism from Ryerson University in Toronto and writes professionally in a broad variety of genres. She has worked as a senior manager in public relations and communications for major telecommunication companies, and is the former Deputy Director for Media Relations with the Modern Coalition. Jasmine writes primarily in our LGBTTQQIAAP and Science section.


Share

Recommended For You

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *