A Giant Spider-Web Covers An Entire Shoreline In Aitoliko, Greece

Share

The warmer climate conditions in western Greece have led to a bizarre phenomenon. Namely, a spectacular 300m-long spider-web covers an entire shoreline in Aitoliko, Greece. However, the strange occurrence is not unusual for scientists.

As reported by Daily Hellas, a broad area of greenery has been cloaked by the silvery spider-web produced by Tetragnatha spiders. According to the scientists, however, the Tetragnatha spiders are usually building such large webs for mating purposes, and this phenomenon is occurring seasonally.

But this particular spider-web is one of the largest ever witnessed and, as the local scientists admitted, the increased number of mosquitoes led to the appearance of more Tetragnatha spiders.

While the giant spider-web in Aitoliko, Greece, might look bizarre, the phenomenon is not at all harmful for humans, animals in the region, or the local flora. Even more, the vast silky cover made up by spiders is not going to last long.

Giant spider-web covers an entire shoreline in Aitoliko, Greece

According to Maria Chatzaki, professor of molecular biology and genetics at Democritus University of Thrace, Greece, global warming (which caused a significant temperature increase in the region), elevated humidity, and sufficient food in the area of Aitoliko caused a massive boost in the number of Tratragnatha spiders populations.

“It’s as if the spiders are taking advantage of these conditions and are having a kind of a party. They mate, they reproduce and provide a whole new generation. These spiders are not dangerous for humans and will not cause any damage to the area’s flora. The spiders will have their party and will soon die,” explained Maria Chatzaki.

In short, a giant spider-web of 300 meters long and made by Tetagnatha spiders covers an entire shoreline in Aitoliko, Greece, but unfortunately, the magnificent creation won’t last long because, as soon as the spiders mate and lay eggs, they will die.

mm

Jasmine holds a Master’s in Journalism from Ryerson University in Toronto and writes professionally in a broad variety of genres. She has worked as a senior manager in public relations and communications for major telecommunication companies, and is the former Deputy Director for Media Relations with the Modern Coalition. Jasmine writes primarily in our LGBTTQQIAAP and Science section.


Share

Recommended For You

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *