4-year-old ‘Growling Like a Dog’, B.C. Naturopath Treated Him With Rabid Dog Saliva

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A concerned mother took her little boy to a naturopath to help her with the boy’s behavior. The boy was aggressive at school and you hide under tables and growl like a dog. He also had problems sleeping. When questioned if the boy was recently bitten by a dog, the mother answered that it happened when he was only 2 years old.

That’s when the naturopath, Anke Zimmermann, got the idea to treat the boy with the saliva of a rabid dog. If you’re wondering how she got that, there’s no need to worry! There is a homeopathic remedy approved by Health Canada that contains the saliva. Probably the dog that bit the boy was vaccinated for rabies.

Rabies is Fatal in Humans And Animals

After Zimmermann told the story in a blog post on February, a provincial health officer was baffled to hear such thing. Dr. Bonnie Henry stated that:

“Rabies is a serious reportable communicable disease that is almost universally fatal in humans and in dogs, and it can be spread through saliva from an infected dog.”

As a response, in an interview for Global News, Zimmermann says that homeopathy works on the “similarity principle”, arguing that a substance that causes symptoms in a healthy organism will treat the symptoms in a sick organism.

Zimmermann believes that the boy was bitten by a dog that recently received the rabies vaccine, and that bite from a rabid animal can “imprint a rabies type of state which can include overexcitability, difficulty sleeping, aggression and various fears, especially of dogs or wolves. This child presented a perfect picture of the rabies state.”

Lyssinum Could Put Patients’ Health at Risk

The two pills of Lyssinum 200CH the boy got as treatment contain rabid dog saliva that was diluted 200 times, so Zimmermann said that it would be “essentially impossible” for the boy to develop rabies from the treatment.

Henry, the health officer, stated that she hasn’t found any evidence of the therapeutic benefits from treatments with Lyssinum:

“More importantly, I am concerned that if a product did actually contain what is suggested, saliva from a rabid dog, that would put the patient at risk of contracting rabies, a serious, fatal illness.” Moreover, she urges Health Canada to review Lyssinum as it might pose a “potential health risk to patients.”

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Andre Blair s is the lead editor for Advocator.ca. He holds a B.A. in Psychology from the University of Toronto, and a Master of Science in Public Health (M.S.P.H.) from the School of Public Health, Department of Health Administration, at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill. Andre specializes in environmental health, but writes on a variety of issues.


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