What you need to know About Hepatitis

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Even if Daryl Luster always felt tired and unable to concentrate, when he first discovered he has hepatitis C, was taken by surprise.

He was close to 50 when the disease started to be chronic.

 “My world fell apart. I didn’t know anything about hep C. I thought it was a death sentence,” Luster stated, the president of the Pacific Hepatitis Network.

A remedy for treating hepatitis has been discovered and is considered to be a real success.

Five hepatitis viruses have been revealed by the specialists, demonstrating that this leads to the inflammation of the liver.

By consuming infested food or water you can take hepatitis A, which is similar with hepatitis E, but with no way of treatment. Asia is the most affected.

Unlike hepatitis A, hepatitis B can be transmitted by semen, blood and is also sexually transmissible, but a vaccine was found.

Hepatitis C can be transmitted if the patient has been infected with blood during transfusions, but like hepatitis B, you can take it by sex. It can be cured with anti-virals.

The Canadian state tested people born between 1945-1975 for hepatitis C.

Sometimes can take decades for the signs to become evident, few of them are jaundice, kind of the flu symptoms, fatigue, fever and dark urine.

Due to the fact that hep C was not discovered at that time, blood transfusions before 1990  are considered alarming.

You can ask your doctor for a blood test. Most of the people may be ashamed because is sometimes associated with bad habits such as drug use.

But, is better to find it quickly to prevent any damage. Some people can even destroy it with their immune system.

For hepatitis C, you are treated for 8 to 10 weeks with anti-viral medication. According to a study, it works on 90% of the people.

“It’s incredible. We’ve really come a long way. It’s a miracle of modern biology.”

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Brad is a former Senior Fellow at the Schuster Institute for Investigative Journalism at Brandeis University, is an award-winning travel, culture, and parenting writer. His writing has appeared in many of the Canada’s most respected and credible publications, including the Toronto Star, CBC News and on the cover of Smithsonian Magazine. A meticulous researcher who’s not afraid to be controversial, he is nationally known as a journalist who opens people’s eyes to the realities behind accepted practices in the care of children. Brad is a contributing journalist to Advocator.ca


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