The Simulator that Instructs Physicians Better than a Teacher

Share

Technology and especially new appliances make doctors work much easier. Researchers have created a device whereby they can improve their performance with injections.

Administration of certain injections, such as epidurals, can be difficult for the most experienced physicians. A team of researchers argued that current training methods for medical staff are costly and doesn’t prepare them for all possible situations.

Thus, they have created a needle insertion simulator that helps doctors improve their technique and dexterity.

The hand-held device simulates the sensation that the instrument gives you when it passes through multiple layers of tissue. As a matter of fact, these factors are crucial because the physician’s hands must produce a constant insertion rate, which can be difficult.

To properly evaluate the user’s performance, the device is connected to a computer program. In this way, the simulator works in harmony, and the program interface gives the physician feedback in real time. Thus, the system provides an effective surgical training program.

“Those of us who teach these procedures see the process as difficult”, said Sanjib Adhikary, a collaborator of the project. He believes that the simulator will help physicians more to master these abilities than teachers can do.

The device can prepare residents before they can start the patient’s procedures. “It also gives them a great way to evaluate their performance and to understand where there is room for improvement”, said Jason Moore, associate professor of mechanical engineering at Penn State.

The researchers say that eventually the instrument could be adapted to train physicians in other specialties such as emergency medicine, radiology and surgery. They also think the device will have an impact, especially because it is a cost-effective alternative.

mm

Jasmine holds a Master’s in Journalism from Ryerson University in Toronto and writes professionally in a broad variety of genres. She has worked as a senior manager in public relations and communications for major telecommunication companies, and is the former Deputy Director for Media Relations with the Modern Coalition. Jasmine writes primarily in our LGBTTQQIAAP and Science section.


Share

Recommended For You

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *