Salmonella Warning On Frozen Raw Breaded Chicken Products

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Canada’s chief medical officers came out with a joint statement after associating hundreds of Salmonellosis cases over the past 16 months to frozen raw breaded chicken products contaminated with Salmonella.

“Food contaminated with Salmonella may not look or smell spoiled”

“Such products include chicken nuggets, chicken strips, chicken burgers, popcorn chicken, and chicken fries. Canadians need to be aware that even though these products may appear to be cooked, they are not,” Canada’s chief medical officers stated.

Additionally, Canada’s health officials recommended Canadians to handle frozen raw breaded chicken products with caution and to prepare them according to the instructions on the label but not below an internal temperature of at least 74 degrees Celsius or 165 degrees Fahrenheit.

Also, according to a media release, “food contaminated with Salmonella may not look or smell spoiled — but can still make people sick.”

The Government of Canada works with food manufacturing companies to reduce risks of Salmonella contamination

Recently, the Federal Government of Canada works with food manufacturing companies and retailers to find a way to reduce the risk of Salmonella contamination. However, they stated that the products that are now on the stores’ shelves, especially the frozen raw breaded chicken products, might still be infected with Salmonella.

However, until April 1, 2019, and likely for up to a year afterward, frozen raw breaded chicken products containing Salmonella will continue to be in the marketplace and in freezers across the country,” continues the release.

“For every laboratory-confirmed illness reported, we know there are dozens of more unreported illnesses in Canada. During this same period [the past 16 months], there have also been food recall warnings issued for seven different frozen raw breaded chicken products,” it says.

The majority of the people who get Salmonellosis recover within a week, but there are some who require hospitalization due to more severe complications. Also, some Salmonellosis cases could be fatal.

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Jasmine holds a Master’s in Journalism from Ryerson University in Toronto and writes professionally in a broad variety of genres. She has worked as a senior manager in public relations and communications for major telecommunication companies, and is the former Deputy Director for Media Relations with the Modern Coalition. Jasmine writes primarily in our LGBTTQQIAAP and Science section.


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