Reasons For Which New Drug Mixtures Such As Monkey Dust And Krokodil Keep Appearing

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The whole use of Internet lessened the recreational drug use and helped transform it into a worldwide issue. For legislators, drug consumption has become a moving target that has a higher speed with each passing day.

Over the past years, there have been a lot of changes in the ways in which drugs are used, and all kinds of new combinations have been popping up. Why does such a thing happen?

Mixtures of drugs keep popping up 

It’s already a known fact for quite a while that street samples of heroin often include a mixture of more drugs and in some cases, various drugs are added to counter the effects of the drug that’s been taken.

Street samples of heroin are often mixed with benzodiazepines (usually diazepam and temazepam) and barbiturates (usually phenobarbitone).

Benzodiazepines are anti-anxiety drugs, and they are added to reduce the stress of taking the heroin.

When the body clears the heroin from the system, this process is able to trigger a pseudo-epileptic fit.

Some barbiturates, especially phenobarbitone, have been used to control epilepsy and these are often added to reduce the risk of fitting after taking heroin.

Latest trends

Unfortunately, taking drugs or mixtures can also be part of a trend. A recently reported trend is the growth in the use of the so-called monkey dust in the UK.

This is a synthetic stimulant related to the cathinone, and it has similar effects to cocaine and amphetamines.

In Russia, another trend involves the drug krokodil, which is a homemade version of the synthetic opioid called desomorphine which is basically a cheaper option for heroin.

This is manufactured from codeine, but its use can trigger horrifying physical injuries as well as the harms associated with drug abuse itself.

Closing words

People take drug mixtures because they’re looking for a more intense high and this is one of the reasons for which such trends appear.

The consequences of taking drug mixtures are always terrifying, and they usually vary based on age, gender, health status, drug taking history and the mood of the user.

Rada attended the courses in the Faculty of Letters, Romanian-English section, and finished the Faculty of Theatre and Television, Theatrical Journalism section, both within the framework of Babeş-Bolyai University of Cluj-Napoca. Up till now, she reviewed books, movies, and theatre-plays, enjoying subjects from the cultural niche. Her experience in writing also intersects the IT niche, given the fact that she worked as a content editor for firms that produce software for mobile devices. She is collaborating with online advertising agencies, writing articles for several websites and blogs.


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