Consuming Milk At Breakfast Can Keep Type 2 Diabetes At Bay

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Breakfast is the most important meal of the day, and we already know that. However, when it comes to people with diabetes, the situation is different as they always have to be careful about what they eat. Luckily, a new study carried out by the Human Nutraceutical Research Unit at the University of Guelph, in collaboration with the University of Toronto, revealed that consuming milk at breakfast can keep type 2 diabetes at bay.

There is a need for dietary strategies to lower the risks of type 2 diabetes and obesity

Examining the effects of consuming high-protein milk during the first meal of the day and how this habit might affect the blood sugar level throughout the day, the researchers from the universities as mentioned above noticed that milk is ideal for maintaining a normal glycemic index in individuals with type 2 diabetes.

“Metabolic diseases are on the rise globally, with type 2 diabetes and obesity as leading concerns in human health. Thus, there is an impetus to develop dietary strategies for the risk reduction and management of obesity and diabetes to empower consumers to improve their personal health,” stated Douglas Goff, Ph.D., from the University of Guelph.

Consuming milk at breakfast keeps type 2 diabetes at bay

In a double-blinded study, the investigators found out that consuming whey protein from milk during breakfast, combined with high-carbohydrate food, such as cereals, supports the production of gastric hormones that slow digestion, increase satiety, and reduce blood glucose levels to the regular ones in type 2 diabetes patients.

However, the researchers also stressed that high-protein milk, rich in whey protein, especially, is much more effective in reducing and maintaining blood sugar levels, thus, keeping type 2 diabetes at bay.

“This study confirms the importance of milk at breakfast time to aid in the slower digestion of carbohydrate and to help maintain lower blood sugar levels. Nutritionists have always stressed the importance of a healthy breakfast, and this study should encourage consumers to include milk,” concluded Dr. Goff and his co-workers.

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Jasmine holds a Master’s in Journalism from Ryerson University in Toronto and writes professionally in a broad variety of genres. She has worked as a senior manager in public relations and communications for major telecommunication companies, and is the former Deputy Director for Media Relations with the Modern Coalition. Jasmine writes primarily in our LGBTTQQIAAP and Science section.


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