Cannabis Users Might Experience A “Noisy Brain” During Rest, A Study Revealed

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A new study revealed something astonishing that contradicts some of the most common beliefs among pot smokers. Accordingly, cannabis users might experience a “noisy brain” during rest, which is nothing else than the cortical activation which, the scientists consider, is not at all helpful for a quality night sleep.

Cannabis users who want to enjoy a dreamy mood over the night are usually smoking pot right before getting in bed, but that’s not at all healthy, according to new research. Smoking weed right before sleep, which until now was thought to help people rest better, is activating the cortex several times during the time of rest in comparison with sober individuals who did not show similar brain activity.

The primary implication of a “noisy brain” is that cannabis users showed activation of the majority of various brain waves which scientists already witnessed in the patients suffering from heroin or cocaine addiction.

Cannabis users experience a “noisy brain” during rest which might affect the quality of the sleep

The new research, called “Increased cortical activation in cannabis users’ brains in resting state, research suggests” and published in the Science Daily journal, debunked a long-lasting belief among pot smokers that lightning up a small joint before going to bed brings a dreamy mood and helps people rest better.

However, the scientists found evidence that smoking pot, in general, makes smokers experience a “noisy brain” during rest which might affect the quality of the sleep. But, the study concludes that further studies are needed to conclude whether a “noisy brain” is indeed detrimental or not. Unfortunately, in many countries around the world the cannabis is a high-risk drug, legally speaking, so researching it is costly.

As the scientists said, having extra activity in the brain during sleep hours must have some negative consequences, only that they couldn’t study this further, so we’ll have to wait for more research to be done to find out.

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Jasmine holds a Master’s in Journalism from Ryerson University in Toronto and writes professionally in a broad variety of genres. She has worked as a senior manager in public relations and communications for major telecommunication companies, and is the former Deputy Director for Media Relations with the Modern Coalition. Jasmine writes primarily in our LGBTTQQIAAP and Science section.


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