Scientists Might Have Solved The Mystery Behind Seismic Waves In The Indian Ocean (And It’s Not About Meteorites Or Sea Monsters)

Share

It was recently reported that an extraordinary seismic event shook Earth on November 11. It was picked up by earthquake sensors that are stationed across the world.

The cause of this disturbance has been unknown for a while, but it seems to be linked somehow to an ongoing seismic swarm that has been rumbling the archipelago of Mayotte in the Indian Ocean for a few months now.

What is still not very clear is what this strange tremors ultimately mean.

“I don’t think I’ve seen anything like it,” seismologist Göran Ekström from Columbia University told National Geographic about the November 11 anomaly.

Anyway, Stephen Hicks, a seismologist at the University of Southampton, tweeted a day after the event on November 12: “Something biggggg, yet strangely slow, sent seismic rumblings around the surface of much of the planet yesterday.”

After that, a discussion that took place on Twitter erupted between various experts who seemed to not quite be able to place their fingers on what happened exactly to trigger all this.

Suggestions were multiple, and they included potential causes such as tectonic earthquakes, landslides, meteorite impact and some of them went so far to guess that the “sea monsters” are to blame.

One plausible theory

Of course, all of these were ruled out, and there was one theory instead that the scientists believed to be the most viable of them all.

Anthony Lomax who is an independent seismology consultant told the MailOnline that the shakes were “almost certainly” triggered by undersea activity to the northeast of Mayotte.

“Inflation/deflation and collapse of volcano calderas, and movement of magma under a volcano can produce a wide variety of seismic signals, including long period and repetitive waves like those observed November 11,” he told the Mail.

More scientists are planning to survey the ocean in order to find out any potential additional data that could help explain the mysterious event.

Rada attended the courses in the Faculty of Letters, Romanian-English section, and finished the Faculty of Theatre and Television, Theatrical Journalism section, both within the framework of Babeş-Bolyai University of Cluj-Napoca. Up till now, she reviewed books, movies, and theatre-plays, enjoying subjects from the cultural niche. Her experience in writing also intersects the IT niche, given the fact that she worked as a content editor for firms that produce software for mobile devices. She is collaborating with online advertising agencies, writing articles for several websites and blogs.


Share

Recommended For You

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *