Climate Change Effects Are Mirrored By Insects After Birds And Bees

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After birds and bees, now the effects of the climate change are mirrored by insects and arthropods as well. These suffered massive losses, says a study from a Puerto Rico forest published yesterday, October 15.

The population of arthropods includes insects, caterpillars, and spiders and measuring it not the easiest thing to do. This can be done by placing sticky traps on the ground and in the forest canopy.

Another way is that researchers pass nets hundreds of times over the ground or in the foliage before weighing the dry captured biomass.

This is precisely what biologist Bradford Lister did in 1976 and 1977 in El Yunque National Forest in the US Caribbean commonwealth of Puerto Rico.

Lister, of Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute in Troy, New York, returned there with another biologist in 2011 and 2012 to use the same methods.

Everything is dropping 

They have found that the dry weight biomass of arthropods that have been captured in sweep samples has declined between 4 to 8 times and 30 to 60 times in sticky traps, according to their findings published in the US Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences.

This decline came together with parallel reductions in insectivorous lizards, frogs, and birds, according to observations by the researchers.

“Everything is dropping,” Lister told The Washington Post, warning of cascading effects on the food chain.

“If the tropical forests go, it will be yet another catastrophic failure of the whole Earth system,” he said, “that will feed back on human beings in an almost unimaginable way.”

A study that has been published in the journal Science in August concluded that besides the tropical regions, there’s an increase in temperature that was going to stimulate the population of harmful insects which will ravage more humans.

In order to avoid the massive global climate chaos it will be required a gigantic transformation of society, and the world economy which is unprecedented in scale said the UN in a report.

Rada attended the courses in the Faculty of Letters, Romanian-English section, and finished the Faculty of Theatre and Television, Theatrical Journalism section, both within the framework of Babeş-Bolyai University of Cluj-Napoca. Up till now, she reviewed books, movies, and theatre-plays, enjoying subjects from the cultural niche. Her experience in writing also intersects the IT niche, given the fact that she worked as a content editor for firms that produce software for mobile devices. She is collaborating with online advertising agencies, writing articles for several websites and blogs.


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