Would You Drink Cockroach Milk? It’s the Next Trend of ‘Superfoods’

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We will start this article by saying ‘EEEEEWWW’ and then assess some of the facts biochemists and researchers stated over the years on this matter.

Many scientists claim that insects are loaded with protein, but in a 2016 report, a new fact was revealed. The Pacific Beetle cockroaches can create milk crystals – which are filled with nutrients. Biochemist Subramanian Ramaswamy said on the research:

“I don’t think anyone is going to like it if you tell them, ‘We extracted crystals from a cockroach, and that is going to be food.’” He then added that they would need to do more research in showing how it can benefit humans.

Other studies show that producing cockroach milk is difficult. Researchers need 1,000 cockroaches to make 100 grams of milk. But there are some options like a pill which includes the milk.

It’s Called Entomilk

Two years have passed since the study was conducted and people are already consuming ectomilk at the Gourmet Grubb in Cape Town. The shop has a website that wrote:

“Eating insects as is or in powdered form is a tad boring. … Therefore we use entomilk to make our delicious ice cream. Think of entomilk as a sustainable, nature-friendly, nutritious, lactose-free, delicious, guilt-free dairy alternative of the future.”

Many products using insects have become mainstream, although populations all over the globe have consumed them for proteins for decades.

Take for example the Ontario based business of crickets. The president of Entomo Farms in Norwood, Jarrod Goldin, said that demand is higher than they can keep up with:

“Yes, there will be people who think [insects] are icky or have a yuck factor, but the ingredients are so versatile. This idea that insects are for the poor and disenfranchised is really missing the point. The truth is there are nutritional health benefits that would be good for everybody.”

As for cockroach milk, he thinks that Canadians are not ready for it, but they could probably go for it if it were mixed into a protein product.

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Andre Blair s is the lead editor for Advocator.ca. He holds a B.A. in Psychology from the University of Toronto, and a Master of Science in Public Health (M.S.P.H.) from the School of Public Health, Department of Health Administration, at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill. Andre specializes in environmental health, but writes on a variety of issues.


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