Toronto Public Health Possible Exposure to Hepatitis A at Union Station Food Kiosk

Share

People who recently ate at a Union Station food kiosk might have been exposed to Hepatitis A, warns Toronto Public Health.

On 12 June, the health unit stated in a news release that one of the employees at the Calii Love kiosk tested positive for Hepatitis A after coming back to work:

“An employee of the restaurant has a confirmed case of hepatitis A that was likely acquired during travel to another country.”

Toronto Public Health warns that anyone who ate or had drinks at the Calii Love kiosk at Union Station between 14 May and 29 May and on 8 – 9 June (between 11 a.m. and 4 p.m.) might have been exposed to Hepatitis A.

In the news release, officials stated:

“While the risk of getting the infection through consuming food from this kiosk is low, individuals who visited this restaurant during those dates and times should watch for signs and symptoms and practice thorough hand washing.”

The Symptoms For Hepatitis A

Hepatitis A can cause liver infection, and the most common symptoms of the infection with the virus are fever, tiredness, loss of appetite, nausea, vomiting, dark urine, stomach pain and the skin turning yellow (jaundice). These symptoms can last for a few months, and some people never show them although infected with the virus.

A good way to avoid infection with Hepatitis A is to get vaccinated, to wash your hands and, if you are ill, to let others prepare the food.

Toronto Public Health will hold free vaccination clinics at Metro Hall, on 55 John Street, today 13 June from 3 p.m. to 7 p.m. and tomorrow from 12 p.m. to 6 p.m. for anyone who ate or drank at the Calii Love kiosk on 8 or 9 June.

They have a phone number where they’ll answer all the questions about hepatitis A: 416-338-7600. You can also contact your doctor. The city’s website has more information regarding this issue.

mm

Andre Blair s is the lead editor for Advocator.ca. He holds a B.A. in Psychology from the University of Toronto, and a Master of Science in Public Health (M.S.P.H.) from the School of Public Health, Department of Health Administration, at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill. Andre specializes in environmental health, but writes on a variety of issues.


Share

Recommended For You

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *