Thousands Remain In the Dark After Powerful Wind Storm in Ontario

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Environment Canada has issued a warning on upcoming windstorms in Ontario and other regions starting with Thursday, but nobody would have expected to be of this proportion.

Not only thousands of people and businesses have been left with no electricity, but roofs have been taken by powerful winds, trees injured people and destroyed property and roads had to be closed to avoid accidents.

Hydro repair crews are at the moment working to restore electricity. On early Thursday, the outage map posted by Hydro One showed almost 38,000 outages, and it peaked at 88,000.

Hydro One made the following statement:

“The high winds have caused 297 outages affecting over 84,000 customers. It is expected that the high winds will continue throughout the evening, increasing the potential for further damage. Where safe, Hydro One crews are out assessing damage and restoring power to customers.”

Tori Gass, the Toronto Hydro spokesperson also said that they have extra crews working to fix the lines and outages.

The weather agency warned the public about the incoming natural hazard:

“Roads may be slippery at times locally this evening and overnight. Damage to buildings, such as to roof shingles and windows, may occur.”

Western Quebec was also hit by strong winds, and suburbs in Montreal had more than 55,000 outages.

The strongest winds reached 100km/h in Port Colborne – Lake Erie shoreline. Then, in Hamilton, Brockville, and the Pearson International and Toronto’s Billy Bishop airports suffered winds of 90 km/h.

The powerful winds not only brought down trees, signs, or tiles, but they also ripped bricks off the side of a residence in Ottawa.

North of Toronto, almost 50 vehicles were involved in a major collision, according to the provincial police. In eastern Ontario, a pedestrian was hit by a tree, but fortunately, he only suffered minor injuries, said Const. Adam Donaldson (Belleville, Ontario police).

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Andre Blair s is the lead editor for Advocator.ca. He holds a B.A. in Psychology from the University of Toronto, and a Master of Science in Public Health (M.S.P.H.) from the School of Public Health, Department of Health Administration, at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill. Andre specializes in environmental health, but writes on a variety of issues.


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