Scientists Claim that Ibuprofen may Help Prevent Alzheimer

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Alzheimer is a disease that sets in at a relatively old age and that has not been cured so far. The only way to “cure” this disease is to slow down its progress. However, a group of scientists have come up with an interesting find. They found out that, by taking over the counter Ibuprofen,  the inflammation in the brain caused by the group of proteins that are responsible for memory loss can be lessened.

How will this work?

The main advice that the Canadian scientists have come up with is that people should start taking a small dose of Ibuprofen on a daily basis in order to prevent dementia from setting in.

The lead researcher of this study is Doctor Patrick Green. He stated that this discovery completely changes the game. Apart from having a developed a test to see if a person is predisposed to develop Alzheimer later on in their lives, they now also have this discovery which could, later on, be developed in a way to eradicate dementia altogether.

Can doctors spot dementia before it starts to happen?

The answer to that is yes. here is how their test works. They take a saliva swap from the patient and run test on it to determine the levels of amyloid protein. If the levels of this protein are too high doctors know that it is toxic and that it will damage neurons, therefore setting in Alzheimer in its early stages.

The production levels do not vary depending on gender or age so it is a certain indicator of what is happening inside the brain. If the levels are two or three times higher than the average value then doctors know that they may have an Alzheimer case on their hands. This study could pave the way for future discoveries in the medical field.

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Brad is a former Senior Fellow at the Schuster Institute for Investigative Journalism at Brandeis University, is an award-winning travel, culture, and parenting writer. His writing has appeared in many of the Canada’s most respected and credible publications, including the Toronto Star, CBC News and on the cover of Smithsonian Magazine. A meticulous researcher who’s not afraid to be controversial, he is nationally known as a journalist who opens people’s eyes to the realities behind accepted practices in the care of children. Brad is a contributing journalist to Advocator.ca


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