Robotic Geologist to be Sent on Mars by NASA

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If six years ago we witnessed NASA sending the first robot on Mars with successful results that we can see up to this day, it looks like they are planning to expand their horizons and send another one on Mars very soon. The purpose of this robotic geologist will be to dig deep, deeper than before and collect as much data as possible, including temperature and other parameters.

The Mars InSight spacecraft

This spacecraft is set to launch this weekend and it will carry a lot of instruments in order to measure the pulse of the planet, more exactly measuring what scientist call “marsquackes”. We first heard from Bruce Banerdt that is part of NASA’s Jet propulsion Laboratory who said that all these instruments will give scientist the ability to stare deep into the planet’s core in a way that they were not able to do before.

The main goal of this mission is to have a better understanding of how the rocky planet formed. Mars is such a good example since it is a smaller planet which managed to preserve in a way the signs of early planetary evolution. The data that the Mars InSight spacecraft is going to collect will be thoroughly analyzed by scientists back at NASA.

Were we to think if the science objectives of this mission are oddly similar to other programs that have taken place in the past, we could compare this mission with the Apollo program since we can see a small resemblance between them.

This mission is truly ambitious which is why its success rate rests at about 40 percent at the moment.  The most difficult task with this spacecraft will be landing it on mars since it is roughly the size of a couple of office desks meaning it will be very difficult to maneuver.

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Brad is a former Senior Fellow at the Schuster Institute for Investigative Journalism at Brandeis University, is an award-winning travel, culture, and parenting writer. His writing has appeared in many of the Canada’s most respected and credible publications, including the Toronto Star, CBC News and on the cover of Smithsonian Magazine. A meticulous researcher who’s not afraid to be controversial, he is nationally known as a journalist who opens people’s eyes to the realities behind accepted practices in the care of children. Brad is a contributing journalist to Advocator.ca


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