Meat Pie Is Not The Healthy Protein in Your Diet, According to Scientists

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If you think that meat pie, burgers or pizza with meat is protein, then we have some bad news. This is not what scientists call a high protein healthy diet!

A survey conducted by CSIRO revealed some details on the diet of 200,000 Australians. People eating ‘low-quality’ food consumed eight times more protein from junk food than the ones with a ‘high-quality’ diet. However, they were also three times more likely to be obese.

Not All Foods With Protein Are Healthy

The CSIRO Principal Research Scientist is Professor Manny Noakes, who argues that:

“Everyone’s protein needs are different, and not all foods that contain protein are good for you. The current recommendations for protein intake underestimate protein requirements during weight loss – the latest science suggests eating 1.2-1.6 grams per kilogram of bodyweight for optimal weight loss.”

He also explains that an average weight man or a woman that want to lose weight should eat the recommended protein intake. They should also eat a healthy diet to properly lose weight. However, Professor Noakes says that over 60% of Australians are overweight or obese, many of them not getting the proteins from healthy food.

On the CSIRO website, there is a protein calculator to help the public measure the proper intake according to the bodyweight. Qualified dietitians can also recommend the amount of proteins needed, and they can also create a personalized diet.

Eat Healthy Meals to Reduce the Cravings for Junk Food

Nonetheless, foods we should stay away from are: pies, burgers, pizza with processed meat, chicken nuggets, sausages, cakes, biscuits or ice cream – all being part of a low-quality diet.

Healthy diets include proteins that come from whole foods, from unprocessed chicken, red meat, fish, eggs, cereals, milk, yogurt, and nuts.

Finally, Professor Noakes explains how we can stay away from junk food:

“Higher protein healthy meals help to control appetite and can help to reduce the urge to indulge in junk food.”

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Andre Blair s is the lead editor for Advocator.ca. He holds a B.A. in Psychology from the University of Toronto, and a Master of Science in Public Health (M.S.P.H.) from the School of Public Health, Department of Health Administration, at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill. Andre specializes in environmental health, but writes on a variety of issues.


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