March For Science Had a Smaller Crowd This Year

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Last year, scientists, researchers, doctors and many concerned citizens took time to join the March for Science. This year, on 14 April, the event had a smaller crowd, but they were set on making their voices heard.

Among the many wishes, the aim was to encourage all lawmakers in the world that implement policies to use evidence based on science.

On the official website of the March for Science event wrote:

“Science advocacy should not be limited to times when our country faces crises or focused only on change at the federal level. It is our responsibility to hold all policy makers — from school board members to mayors to the president—accountable for developing and enacting evidence-based policy.”

These demands are specific to the government of the U.S, but they also said that there are organizers everywhere in the world that are working together to “encourage advocacy in all countries”.

March for Science 2018

This year, the event’s main location was outside the National Mall in Washington, D.C. All over the world there were 230 events scheduled: people from Abuja, London, Munich, and NYC gathered to be part of the demonstration. However, the event was smaller than the first edition.

Mackenzie Mittleman stated in an interview to CNN that “there definitely aren’t as many people present this year, but the people and speakers here are equally as passionate to help advocate for science.”

Speakers in DC focused on the importance of having more diverse people in the scientific field, like people of color, immigrants, women and even people with disabilities. Other people talked about the need to respond to problems in society like gun violence, opioid crisis, and contaminated drinking water.

People gathered and talked or wrote signs with their opinions. J.B. Pritzker stated that “It’s a shame that in 2018 we still have to have a march” for science. Brian Malow, science comedian said that “It seems absurd to come out for a march for science. It’s like a march for breathing.”

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Andre Blair s is the lead editor for Advocator.ca. He holds a B.A. in Psychology from the University of Toronto, and a Master of Science in Public Health (M.S.P.H.) from the School of Public Health, Department of Health Administration, at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill. Andre specializes in environmental health, but writes on a variety of issues.


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