Major Depression May be Found in Your Genes, Study Says

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It looks like a team of researchers has just come up with a finding that could possibly revolutionize how depression is treated. The study was done by the Psychiatric Genomics Consortium. This study stands out since it is the largest study done so far on the genetic predisposition and genetic risk factors for developing depression. This study was published in the journal Nature Genetics this Thursday.

What did the study find?

Well, first of all, the study showed that everyone carries at least one of the 44 genetic variants that are known to be a risk factor for developing depression, showing that no one is as safe as they think they are. The condition that they looked at in particular was major depressive disorder or MDD. These genes have also been seen to link to other psychiatric disorders such as schizophrenia.

This study does build upon the work done by previous researchers and it could pave the way to conducting more comprehensive analysis. How could this be done? Well, since this study has been at such a large scale that it broke record, it could greatly aid the development process of making medications for different psychiatric diseases.

The scale of the study

The team of researchers that worked on this study was made up of more than 200 scientists. When it comes to the amount of data that was collected, the team worked with the cases f around 135 thousand people that suffer from major depression. When it came to the control group, the team decided to gather the data of 344 thousand individuals that had perfect mental health.

The study states that almost 14 per cent of the global population is affected by major depression. Mood Disorders Society of Canada also has a statistic in place which shows that one in 10 Canadians will have to go through one episode of major depression at one point during their lives.

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Brad is a former Senior Fellow at the Schuster Institute for Investigative Journalism at Brandeis University, is an award-winning travel, culture, and parenting writer. His writing has appeared in many of the Canada’s most respected and credible publications, including the Toronto Star, CBC News and on the cover of Smithsonian Magazine. A meticulous researcher who’s not afraid to be controversial, he is nationally known as a journalist who opens people’s eyes to the realities behind accepted practices in the care of children. Brad is a contributing journalist to Advocator.ca


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