Letting Employees Take an Afternoon Nap on Monday Increases Productivity

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Science has come up with a logical solution to the drowsiness that employees experience on Monday morning. The weekend is always a period for workers to unwind and relax after a week’s worth of hard work. It should come as no surprise that come Monday they are tired and have little to no energy to complete their tasks.

How can this problem be solved?

Psychologists that focus on how sleep deprivation affects humans have come up with the conclusion that workers should be able to take a nap at work on Monday in order to not only make them feel rested but to increase their productivity. A researcher from the University of Leeds, Dr. Nerina Ramlakhan, has said that British workers, if they cannot nap on Monday, will only go back on Tuesday with 4 hours of sleep at best.

This week the clocks are going to go forward which means that everyone will sleep a bit less until we get used to the new rhythm, a thing that happens every year. Since people are surrounded by technology that affects their sleeping patterns, such as phones or computers which have an unnatural light that keeps us awake, we are more sleep deprived than all of our ancestors.

Almost 25% of the population sleeps only 5 hours a night. If this is the case for you, after the clock s have gone forward, you may find yourself sleeping only 4 hours a night. Sleep deprivation has been linked with a decrease in focus levels, in memory and in other areas. When we are tired we become less aware of our environments which could lead to accidents. So, if you can, encourage your boss to let you nap for a bit on Monday> If he says no, direct him to this article and tell him to reconsider. A productive worker is the best worker.

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Brad is a former Senior Fellow at the Schuster Institute for Investigative Journalism at Brandeis University, is an award-winning travel, culture, and parenting writer. His writing has appeared in many of the Canada’s most respected and credible publications, including the Toronto Star, CBC News and on the cover of Smithsonian Magazine. A meticulous researcher who’s not afraid to be controversial, he is nationally known as a journalist who opens people’s eyes to the realities behind accepted practices in the care of children. Brad is a contributing journalist to Advocator.ca


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