Florida Brewery Introduces Edible Six-Pack Rings To Save and Feed the Marine Wildlife

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Who hasn’t seen awful footages or photos of marine life entangled in plastic rings? Even the sea birds become victims. Seals choke on them and small sea turtles’ shells get deformed as they grow with the rings around them.

But a brewery Saltwater Brewery, Delray Beach, Florida and the start-up company E6PR partnered to save wildlife and the polluted waters. E6PR took years to research and find the perfect way to create edible six-pack rings.

The E6PR name stands for “edible six-pack rings.” They are the best alternative to plastics which damage the life of the animals inside and around the water.

The Saltwater Brewery has just introduced six-pack rings, which are made of wheat and barley. They are biodegradable, or they can also be consumed by wildlife.

South Florida Stores Sell Beer With Edible Six-Pack Rings

South Florida already has the new edible six-pack rings in stores. According to a news outlet, the start-up E6PR hopes more brewery will follow and buy the rigs to help lower the costs of many years of research.

According to E6PR, they will test the edible rings with other craft breweries. Chris Gove is the co-founder and president at Saltwater Brewery, and he said that:

“Together, we can all be advocates for a clean and safe environment. Our goal is to transition all of the packaging in our facility to this six-pack ring alternative that goes beyond recycling and strives to achieve zero waste.”

Research conducted last year at the Louisiana State University shows that the Gulf of Mexico is a place with the most concentration of plastic waste in the world. Mark Benfield is an LSU oceanographer, and leader of the survey said he was surprised to see how much plastic the Gulf contained:

“I didn’t expect that the gulf would have as much plastic as it did.” Each time his team would dip a net inside the gulf, they’d find plastic waste: “We found it every time.”

If all companies would replace six-pack rings, it’ll be a good start to reduce plastic waste.

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Andre Blair s is the lead editor for Advocator.ca. He holds a B.A. in Psychology from the University of Toronto, and a Master of Science in Public Health (M.S.P.H.) from the School of Public Health, Department of Health Administration, at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill. Andre specializes in environmental health, but writes on a variety of issues.


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