Dementia May be Stopped with the Help of Diet Change

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Dementia is a condition that affects not only the individual but it also has a strong emotional impact on close relatives and family members since they have to go through the devastating process of seeing someone that you care for losing himself or herself, all from an incurable disease. However, a success story may indicate that a change in diet can have beneficial effects from the individual that has this condition.

Mediterranean diet as a small help

The case that we are going to focus on is that of Sylvia Hatzer, an 82-year old woman who has Alzheimer’s. The condition got so bad that she was not able to recognize her own son and she thought that the facility where she was kept for her own had doctors in it that wanted to kidnap her.

In order to change things around they decided to try and put Sylvia on a Mediterranean diet to see if that could help improve her memory. She would be eating more lean meats, such as fish and chicken, and add more nuts and berries to her diet, all filled with vitamins and minerals that are great for the human body.

It looks like Sylvia’s story was such an unexpected success that some of the recipes that she would eat on a regular basis were posted on the online page of the Alzheimer’s Society in the UK. The Alzheimer’s Society claims that a Mediterranean diet could help slow down the effect of dementia on the individual since it is rich in antioxidants which can help fight against the damage that is usually done by Alzheimer to the brain.

Sylvia’s success story is not the only piece of good news out there, with a study published recently stating that women who are active are less likely to develop dementia rather than women who are just moderately fit.

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Brad is a former Senior Fellow at the Schuster Institute for Investigative Journalism at Brandeis University, is an award-winning travel, culture, and parenting writer. His writing has appeared in many of the Canada’s most respected and credible publications, including the Toronto Star, CBC News and on the cover of Smithsonian Magazine. A meticulous researcher who’s not afraid to be controversial, he is nationally known as a journalist who opens people’s eyes to the realities behind accepted practices in the care of children. Brad is a contributing journalist to Advocator.ca


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