Congrats Curiosity! 2000 days on Mars!

Share

“Looks like we made it: 2,000 sols on Mars, you guys!” was the message that Curiosity transmitted to us. This is a joy!

He also wrote that he’s thinking of the 2,000 Martian days of investigation, and actually looking forward to moving higher in those to come. He also said that the zone ahead of him contained clays and that he couldn’t wait to do more research.

How many days on Earth?

That is 2,000 days by Martian measures. A Martian sol, or solar day, is identical to 24 hours, 39 minutes and 35 seconds. So that gives us a number of 2,000 days on Mars, which are equal to 2,055 days on Earth.

In any case, it’s a major turning point this week for researchers anxious for Curiosity to start drilling once more, this time into conceivable earth rich in clay on the slopes of  Mount Sharp.

The rover with six wheels has been investigating Mars ever since the year 2012. Inside and out, it has walked about 11.6 miles.

Flight controllers are trying another drilling strategy

Curiosity’s drill quit working legitimately in 2016, thus designs conceived another approach to drill into Martian rocks and get the pummeled rock tests into the rover’s lab instruments.

Curiosity has been climbing Mount Sharp for clay rocks that researchers cannot wait to investigate. It could reveal extra insight into the part of the water in making Mount Sharp.

Among Curiosity’s discoveries, we can also find some mystic crystal revelations, which are these small precious stones that might be what’s left from an old lake on Mars, or when past groundwater went through sediments.

The group tweeting in the interest of Curiosity has somewhat of a comical inclination, too. They gave us a message, apologizing, saying that Curiosity won’t tweet or react to answers amid the government shutdown. He also wrote that he’d be back as quickly as time permits!

While 2,000 days is a significant accomplishment, it’s not out of the question to specify that the Opportunity rover has outperformed 5,000 days investigating the red planet.

mm

Brad is a former Senior Fellow at the Schuster Institute for Investigative Journalism at Brandeis University, is an award-winning travel, culture, and parenting writer. His writing has appeared in many of the Canada’s most respected and credible publications, including the Toronto Star, CBC News and on the cover of Smithsonian Magazine. A meticulous researcher who’s not afraid to be controversial, he is nationally known as a journalist who opens people’s eyes to the realities behind accepted practices in the care of children. Brad is a contributing journalist to Advocator.ca


Share

Recommended For You

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *