City Tests Garlic Spray to Keep Ticks Away

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Who knew garlic could be the next best thing in repelling ticks? Kingston, Canada is the place where a garlic-based repellant has been used to keep ticks away from the city. Until now, they tested it on the dog park area at Grass Creek Park and on the Centennial Drive to see if the garlic can also keep the geese from walking on the road.

City operations manager Troy Stubinski stated that it’s the first time they’ve tried the repellant there:

“The other groups we’ve talked to have had success with it. We want to see how it works in our application and how effective it is and what it does and where we can go next with it.”

The city chose Grass Creek Park as a pilot location because the area is populated by many residents that go with their pets, and because the Thousand Islands area is ticks’ favorite spot.

Stubinski explained that the rural setting is perfect for the tests because it’s “heavily wooded along the one side of the park, very well used. We’ll get good results from residents to see if they see an impact or a difference.”

“It’s just basically garlic.”

As for the geese, there’s a different side of the story. Apparently, geese don’t like the taste of garlic on the grass:

“We’re not going to get rid of them, but if we can keep them off the road, off the sidewalk that will be a success for us.”

The spray is 100-per-cent natural. The city will test its effectiveness against ticks and mosquitos by applying it once every 3-4 weeks.

Edward Chodowski of Eco-Tick Solutions explains that the solution is a mix of natural products with water and that different combinations can keep away bugs or animals:

“We take a specific amount and mix with water. If we want to get rid of a specific type of animal or bug, we can put another natural product.”

Chodowski proved that the liquid is safe and non-toxic by dipping his hand into the tank from which he strayed the grass. Then, he licked some of the solution, saying that “it’s just basically garlic,” adding that “by the time we’re done, you’re going to want to have a steak.”

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Andre Blair s is the lead editor for Advocator.ca. He holds a B.A. in Psychology from the University of Toronto, and a Master of Science in Public Health (M.S.P.H.) from the School of Public Health, Department of Health Administration, at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill. Andre specializes in environmental health, but writes on a variety of issues.


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