Change How You See the Universe: Tiny Collision Beneath the South Pole

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See how the ghostly particle in Antarctic ice traced by scientists back to 4 billion light-years away can change everything.

Scientists discover a new way of looking at the universe during the analysis of the data from a detector located in a gigantic block of ice from the South Pole. The elusive and eerie particle they found was traced back to one of the most significant objects in existence.

When The IceCube Neutrino Observatory from Antarctica detected a neutrino in September, they asked for help from another telescope to find a source.

The MAGIC Telescope (Major Atmospheric Gamma Imaging Cherenkov) from the Canary Islands along with NASA’s Fermi Gamma-ray Space Telescope discovered the same source of the particle: a blazar, a flare of high-energy cosmic rays shooting into space from a distant supermassive black hole

TXS 0506+056 is how the blazar is called, and its location is at about 4 billion light-years from Earth in a galaxy which is in the direction of the constellation Orion but is not visible with the naked eye.

This is a big step because it is the first time a neutrino was ever traced back to its source and it gives the scientists a new way of observing and measuring the universe.

In conclusion, it is a new way of exploring and seeing some of the most inconceivably powerful forces in the universe. Scientists claim that it is even better than X-ray vision (had by astronomers for decades) and the neutrino also gives the key to unlock the door that opens the ghostly side of astrophysics. If it is thoroughly analyzed, it might provide a freeway for new discoveries in the decades to come. Just stay tuned and look at the stars.

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Brad is a former Senior Fellow at the Schuster Institute for Investigative Journalism at Brandeis University, is an award-winning travel, culture, and parenting writer. His writing has appeared in many of the Canada’s most respected and credible publications, including the Toronto Star, CBC News and on the cover of Smithsonian Magazine. A meticulous researcher who’s not afraid to be controversial, he is nationally known as a journalist who opens people’s eyes to the realities behind accepted practices in the care of children. Brad is a contributing journalist to Advocator.ca


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